Fuck Yeah Drug Policy
Posts tagged with 2012.
Ballot initiative to make Arkansas 17th medical marijuana state possible in 2012 →

arcompassion:

hempchick6:

Arkansas group collecting signatures to place initiative on November 2012 ballot

The Arkansas Legislature never took up medical marijuana in 2011, and there’s little optimism that it will do so in 2012. Fortunately, Arkansans for Compassionate Care (ACC) is working to make sure the voters of Arkansas get a chance to do what the legislature has been unwilling to – remove criminal penalties for the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel certified the initiative in April. ACC has until July 6, 2012 to collect 62,507 valid signatures to place the initiative on the November 2012 ballot, and the latest reports have them roughly one-third of the way toward that number.

The initiative would allow patients with serious illnesses like cancer, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, and PTSD whose doctors recommend medical marijuana to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana. It would also allow patients to purchase marijuana from one of up to about 30 dispensaries in the state, though patients who don’t live near a dispensary would be able to grow their own or designate a caregiver to grow it for them.

So what can you do to help? First and foremost, we need patients to get involved. If you or someone you know is suffering from a serious illness and could benefit from such a law, please send us an email. If you are a law enforcement officer, physician, or clergy member, you too should get involved, as you can also have a powerful impact on the debate.

—source: MPP.org

Thanks so much for the shout-out!

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Follow #cnd2012 on Twitter for live updates from this year’s UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs. Witness world leaders shaping global drug policy.

Follow #cnd2012 on Twitter for live updates from this year’s UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs. Witness world leaders shaping global drug policy.

Marijuana Initiative In Colorado Qualifies For Ballot | The Huffington Post

February 27, 2012—Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler approved a state ballot initiative Monday to legalize and regulate the use of marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol. Voters will decide Nov. 6 whether the measure becomes law.
“This could be a watershed year in the decades-long struggle to end marijuana prohibition in this country,” said Art Way, Colorado manager of the Drug Policy Alliance in a statement Monday. “Marijuana prohibition is counterproductive to the health and public safety of our communities. It fuels a massive, increasingly brutal underground economy, wastes billions of dollars in scarce law enforcement resources, and makes criminals out of millions of otherwise law-abiding citizens.”
[…] If enacted, the measure known as Amendment 64 would allow adults 21 and older to possess and use up to 1 ounce of marijuana. It would allow local governments to prohibit marijuana sales, but provisions decriminalizing personal possession and cultivation of pot would apply statewide. +

Marijuana Initiative In Colorado Qualifies For Ballot | The Huffington Post

February 27, 2012—Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler approved a state ballot initiative Monday to legalize and regulate the use of marijuana in a manner similar to alcohol. Voters will decide Nov. 6 whether the measure becomes law.

“This could be a watershed year in the decades-long struggle to end marijuana prohibition in this country,” said Art Way, Colorado manager of the Drug Policy Alliance in a statement Monday. “Marijuana prohibition is counterproductive to the health and public safety of our communities. It fuels a massive, increasingly brutal underground economy, wastes billions of dollars in scarce law enforcement resources, and makes criminals out of millions of otherwise law-abiding citizens.”

[…] If enacted, the measure known as Amendment 64 would allow adults 21 and older to possess and use up to 1 ounce of marijuana. It would allow local governments to prohibit marijuana sales, but provisions decriminalizing personal possession and cultivation of pot would apply statewide. +

URGENT: Colorado Needs Your Help!
From our friends at Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol:

We need your help!  
The 2012 statewide initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol in Colorado is 2,400 signatures short of qualifying for the November ballot and has has just 7 days to collect them.
There are THREE ways you can help the campaign:
1. Go sign the petition — If you are a registered Colorado voter and have not already signed the petition, visit http://www.regulatemarijuana.org/sign-the-petition for a list of locations where you can sign it. Many of these places will need to mail their petitions in by this coming Monday, Feb. 13th so please check out the list and go sign a petition as soon as possible!
2. Tell others to go sign the petition — Make sure every registered Colorado voter you know has signed the petition.  Pass along this link to a list of signing locations and encourage them to go there and sign right away — http://www.regulatemarijuana.org/sign-the-petition
3. Get a petition and collect signatures (must request TODAY!) — If you are absolutely sure you can collect at least 20 valid signatures of registered Colorado voters who have not yet signed, AND get them back in our hands by Wednesday, Feb. 15th, please contact the campaign immediately at info@regulatemarijuana.org or 303-861-0033 to get a petition. Volunteers are being encouraged to focus on reaching out to those they know (e.g. taking it to where you work, to a party or other small event, or literally asking friends if you can meet up with them to get their signature). Petitions will need to be mailed back no later than Monday (Feb. 13) and the campaign can cover the costs of shipping (they might need to be sent Priority or overnight delivery).

URGENT: Colorado Needs Your Help!

From our friends at Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol:

We need your help!  

The 2012 statewide initiative to regulate marijuana like alcohol in Colorado is 2,400 signatures short of qualifying for the November ballot and has has just 7 days to collect them.

There are THREE ways you can help the campaign:

1. Go sign the petition — If you are a registered Colorado voter and have not already signed the petition, visit http://www.regulatemarijuana.org/sign-the-petition for a list of locations where you can sign it. Many of these places will need to mail their petitions in by this coming Monday, Feb. 13th so please check out the list and go sign a petition as soon as possible!

2. Tell others to go sign the petition — Make sure every registered Colorado voter you know has signed the petition.  Pass along this link to a list of signing locations and encourage them to go there and sign right away — http://www.regulatemarijuana.org/sign-the-petition

3. Get a petition and collect signatures (must request TODAY!) — If you are absolutely sure you can collect at least 20 valid signatures of registered Colorado voters who have not yet signed, AND get them back in our hands by Wednesday, Feb. 15th, please contact the campaign immediately at info@regulatemarijuana.org or 303-861-0033 to get a petition. Volunteers are being encouraged to focus on reaching out to those they know (e.g. taking it to where you work, to a party or other small event, or literally asking friends if you can meet up with them to get their signature). Petitions will need to be mailed back no later than Monday (Feb. 13) and the campaign can cover the costs of shipping (they might need to be sent Priority or overnight delivery).

Budweiser Super Bowl 2012 Commercial: Prohibition

Oregon SSDP Chapters Hosting Conference for Marijuana Legalization | Dare Generation Diary
Saturday, February 25, 2012Lewis & Clark Law SchoolPortland, ORRSVP
Marijuana legalization measure certified in WA | The Seattle Times →

A measure to legalize the recreational use of marijuana is likely to be on the November ballot, after the secretary of the state’s office certified the initiative Friday, saying the campaign had turned in enough valid petition signatures.

Initiative 502 now goes to the Legislature, but lawmakers are not likely to take up the issue during the short 60-day session that ends on March 8, meaning it would automatically appear on the ballot in the fall election.

[…] I-502 would create a system of state-licensed growers, processors and stores, and impose a 25 percent excise on wholesale and retail sales of marijuana. People 21 and over could buy up to an ounce of dried marijuana; one pound of marijuana-infused product in solid form, such as brownies; or 72 ounces of marijuana-infused liquids.+

faussdp:

Ron Paul, why don’t other candidates talk about drug policy? (by SSDP)

^Florida Atlantic University SSDP

Rick Santorum Does Not Know Drug Offenders Have Families

January 6, 2012—Yesterday in Concord, New Hampshire, a member of Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) asked Rick Santorum, “As a champion of family values and keeping America strong, would you continue to destroy families by sending nonviolent drug offenders to prison?” Santorum’s response: “Uh…wow…the federal government doesn’t do that.” That will come as a surprise to the nearly 100,000 drug offenders in federal prison, who account for almost half of all inmates. (Another 400,000 or so are in state prisons and local jails.) Does Santorum think only violent drug offenders go to federal prison? There is no such requirement. 

[…] Santorum, who as a Pennsylvania senator in 1999 voted to increase federal penalties for cocaine and methamphetamine offenses, surely is aware that the laws Congress passes put people behind bars, breaking up their families in the process. Instead of forthrightly defending that result as an acceptable cost of trying to prevent Americans from consuming certain intoxicants, he pretends no real humans are hurt in the service of this never-ending, never-succeeding chemical crusade. Despicable. +

By the way, SSDP has been doing a great job of getting the candidates on the record about where they stand on reforming drug policy. They also caught up with Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney.

The Republican Candidates on Marijuana | NORML
MITT ROMNEY: “We’ve got to not only continue our war on drugs from a police standpoint but also to market again to our young people about the perils of drugs.”
RON PAUL: “This war on drugs has been a detriment to personal liberty and it’s been a real abuse of liberty, Our prisons are full with people who have used drugs who should be treated as patients — and they’re non-violent. Someday we’re gonna awake and find out that the prohibition we are following right now with drugs is no more successful, maybe a lot less successful, than the prohibition of alcohol was in the ’20s.”
RICK SANTORUM: “I believe that the drugs which are currently illegal should remain illegal. I am committed to maintaining the federal government’s role in the ‘war on drugs’, which is fought on many fronts by federal agents, local law enforcement, substance abuse counselors, teachers, parents, and concerned citizens.”
NEWT GINGRICH: “I don’t have a comprehensive view. My general belief is that we ought to be much more aggressive about drug policy. And that we should recognize that the Mexican cartels are funded by Americans. In my mind it means having steeper economic penalties and it means having a willingness to do more drug testing.”
RICK PERRY: “The Governor does not support legalizing any drug. The Governor supports federal drug laws where appropriate. And while the Governor is personally opposed to legalizing the use of medical marijuana, if states want to allow doctor prescribed medical marijuana, it seems to him that under the 10th amendment, they have the right to do so.”
JON HUNTSMAN: “Question: would you prosecute growers and sellers of marijuana in states where it has been made legal?
Jon Huntsman: I would let states decide that.”
Click for more of the candidates’ comments on marijuana policy

The Republican Candidates on Marijuana | NORML

MITT ROMNEY: “We’ve got to not only continue our war on drugs from a police standpoint but also to market again to our young people about the perils of drugs.”

RON PAUL: “This war on drugs has been a detriment to personal liberty and it’s been a real abuse of liberty, Our prisons are full with people who have used drugs who should be treated as patients — and they’re non-violent. Someday we’re gonna awake and find out that the prohibition we are following right now with drugs is no more successful, maybe a lot less successful, than the prohibition of alcohol was in the ’20s.”

RICK SANTORUM: “I believe that the drugs which are currently illegal should remain illegal. I am committed to maintaining the federal government’s role in the ‘war on drugs’, which is fought on many fronts by federal agents, local law enforcement, substance abuse counselors, teachers, parents, and concerned citizens.”

NEWT GINGRICH: “I don’t have a comprehensive view. My general belief is that we ought to be much more aggressive about drug policy. And that we should recognize that the Mexican cartels are funded by Americans. In my mind it means having steeper economic penalties and it means having a willingness to do more drug testing.”

RICK PERRY: “The Governor does not support legalizing any drug. The Governor supports federal drug laws where appropriate. And while the Governor is personally opposed to legalizing the use of medical marijuana, if states want to allow doctor prescribed medical marijuana, it seems to him that under the 10th amendment, they have the right to do so.”

JON HUNTSMAN: “Question: would you prosecute growers and sellers of marijuana in states where it has been made legal?

Jon Huntsman: I would let states decide that.”

Click for more of the candidates’ comments on marijuana policy

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STATES PREPARE TO LEGALIZE IN 2012

So far, Colorado and Washington have submitted enough signatures to qualify for the November ballot.

COLORADO

Proponents of a Colorado marijuana legalization initiative turned in more than 159,000 signatures to the secretary of state’s office Wednesday, nearly twice as many as the 86,500 required for the measure to be approved for the November ballot. The state has 30 days to verify the signatures and approve the measure for the ballot.

The Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act of 2012 would legalize the possession of up to an ounce or six plants (three mature plants) by people 21 or over. It would also compel the state of Colorado to come up with regulations for commercial marijuana cultivation and sales by July 1, 2013.

WASHINGTON

New Approach Washington, the organizers of the I-502 marijuana legalization and regulation initiative, last week handed in 350,000 voter signatures to try to qualify for the November ballot. They turned in 341,000 last Thursday and another 10,000 last Friday, the last day to hand them in.

The campaign needs 241,153 valid signatures to qualify for the ballot. With some 350,000 signatures handed in, the campaign has a considerable cushion to account for duplicate and other invalid signatures, meaning it is likely to qualify for the ballot, but it will take state officials several weeks to make that determination.

I-502 would allow Washington adults to possess up to an ounce of marijuana, which would be sold at pot-only stores licensed and regulated by the state Liquor Control Board. Marijuana cultivation for the state stores would also be licensed and regulated by the board. Estimated excise, business, and sales revenues of $215 million a year would be split between the state’s general fund and certain earmarked public health and prevention programs.

Groups in CALIFORNIAMISSOURI, and OREGON are still in the process of collecting signatures.