Fuck Yeah Drug Policy
Posts tagged with Richard Nixon.
"I can’t imagine that [marijuana legalization is] going to happen, no. The deeper issue is, what does it mean to live in a free country? In the US, something like 80 percent of people in prison are there for ‘consensual crimes.’
I tend to not like politicians, because it’s a subtle form of prostitution. Or maybe not so subtle. It’s all synchronized swimming to me. They all kneel and kiss the ring. Who’s going to take on the oil industry or the medical industry?
People compare Obama to Lyndon Johnson, but I think a better comparison is between Obama and Nixon. Because Nixon came into office saying he was going to pull out of Vietnam, and then he escalated the war. A lot of us were led to believe that Obama was the peace president, but there are still, I think, 70,000 troops in Afghanistan. 
I’m an anarchist, I guess you could say. I think people could be just fine looking after themselves.”
 — Woody Harrelson

"I can’t imagine that [marijuana legalization is] going to happen, no. The deeper issue is, what does it mean to live in a free country? In the US, something like 80 percent of people in prison are there for ‘consensual crimes.’

I tend to not like politicians, because it’s a subtle form of prostitution. Or maybe not so subtle. It’s all synchronized swimming to me. They all kneel and kiss the ring. Who’s going to take on the oil industry or the medical industry?

People compare Obama to Lyndon Johnson, but I think a better comparison is between Obama and Nixon. Because Nixon came into office saying he was going to pull out of Vietnam, and then he escalated the war. A lot of us were led to believe that Obama was the peace president, but there are still, I think, 70,000 troops in Afghanistan. 

I’m an anarchist, I guess you could say. I think people could be just fine looking after themselves.”

 — Woody Harrelson

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT!
The Top Ten International Drug Policy Stories of 2011 | Drug War Chronicle


The new year is almost upon us and 2011 will soon be a year for the history books. But we can’t let it go without recognizing the biggest global drug policy stories of the year. From the horrors of the Mexican drug wars to the growing clamor over the failures of prohibition, from the poppy fields of Afghanistan and the Golden Triangle to the coca fields of the Andes, from European parliaments to Iranian gallows, drug prohibition and its consequences were big news this year. 
Of course, we can’t cover it all. We have no room to note the the emergence of West Africa as a transshipment point for South American cocaine bound for Europe’s booming user markets, nor the unavailability of opioid pain medications in much of the world; we’ve given short shrift to the horrors of “drug treatment” in Southeast Asia; and we’ve barely mentioned the rising popularity of synthetic stimulants in European club scenes, among other drug policy-related issues. We’ll be keeping an eye on all of those, but in the meantime, here are our choices for this year’s most important global drug policy stories… +

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT!

The Top Ten International Drug Policy Stories of 2011 | Drug War Chronicle

The new year is almost upon us and 2011 will soon be a year for the history books. But we can’t let it go without recognizing the biggest global drug policy stories of the year. From the horrors of the Mexican drug wars to the growing clamor over the failures of prohibition, from the poppy fields of Afghanistan and the Golden Triangle to the coca fields of the Andes, from European parliaments to Iranian gallows, drug prohibition and its consequences were big news this year.

Of course, we can’t cover it all. We have no room to note the the emergence of West Africa as a transshipment point for South American cocaine bound for Europe’s booming user markets, nor the unavailability of opioid pain medications in much of the world; we’ve given short shrift to the horrors of “drug treatment” in Southeast Asia; and we’ve barely mentioned the rising popularity of synthetic stimulants in European club scenes, among other drug policy-related issues. We’ll be keeping an eye on all of those, but in the meantime, here are our choices for this year’s most important global drug policy stories… +

Elvis asks to be a soldier in the War on Drugs:

todaysdocument:

On the morning of December 21, 1970, Elvis Presley personally delivered a letter to the northwest gate of the White House. Written on American Airlines stationery, the five-page letter requested a meeting with President Nixon. Presley intended to present the President with a gift of a World War II-era pistol and obtain for himself the credentials of a federal agent in the war on drugs.

Here is the transcript of this letter and more information about this event.

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photo source
The Drug Policy Alliance delivered this one trillion dollar bill to every member of congress on June 17, the 40th anniversary of the war on drugs.
Thanks for the tip, Amanda!

The Drug Policy Alliance delivered this one trillion dollar bill to every member of congress on June 17, the 40th anniversary of the war on drugs.

Thanks for the tip, Amanda!

PA medical cannabis bill named after former governor Shafer, who recommended cannabis decrim under Nixon →

State Representative Mark B. Cohen has re-introduced a bill to regulate medical cannabis in the Keystone State. The legislation, HB1653, has a new name: The Governor Raymond P. Shafer Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act. This refers to the Republican former governor (1967-1971) and PA party leader.

In 1971 Shafer was picked by President Richard Nixon to direct The National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse. Working in an early form of the Controlled Substances Act, marijuana was classified as a prohibited drug. This was thought to be temporary and the blue-ribbon panel was tasked with exploring the issue to determine the final placement .

The team of sociologists, psychologists, physicians, lawmakers and policy experts toured the country to conduct careful research and observations. Shafer then led the effort to craft the final report: “Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding.” It was strikingly candid. The conclusion was that cannabis should not remain in the current narcotic drugs scheme. The Commission went further, recommending that personal possession of cannabis – even transfer for no remuneration – should be decriminalized. +

Just what is so wrong with the war on drugs? | American Constitution Society

So what’s the verdict 40 years later? Have we won the war on drugs? Quite simply, no. From a public safety perspective, the war has been completely ineffective at stemming the supply or use of drugs in this country. From a cost perspective, it’s been horrific – with a whopping $1 trillion price tag thus far and an unimaginably higher toll in lives and families lost to prison. In terms of fairness, it has been a total bust as well. The effect on communities of color has been astonishingly tragic: there are more African-Americans under the control of prison and corrections departments today than were ever enslaved by this country. Even the current head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Gil Kerlikowske, and more recently the Global Commission on Drug Policy, have announced that the drug war has been an abject disaster. +

Just what is so wrong with the war on drugs? | American Constitution Society

So what’s the verdict 40 years later? Have we won the war on drugs? Quite simply, no. From a public safety perspective, the war has been completely ineffective at stemming the supply or use of drugs in this country. From a cost perspective, it’s been horrific – with a whopping $1 trillion price tag thus far and an unimaginably higher toll in lives and families lost to prison. In terms of fairness, it has been a total bust as well. The effect on communities of color has been astonishingly tragic: there are more African-Americans under the control of prison and corrections departments today than were ever enslaved by this country. Even the current head of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Gil Kerlikowske, and more recently the Global Commission on Drug Policy, have announced that the drug war has been an abject disaster. +

theatlantic:

The War on Drugs Turns 40

Police officers, judges, and prison guards opposed to drug prohibition gathered in Washington, D.C., Tuesday to mark an eye-opening milestone: the 40th Anniversary of President Richard Nixon’s War on Drugs. “America’s public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse,” Nixon declared in a June 17, 1971 press conference. “In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new, all-out offensive.” Just two years later he escalated his rhetoric yet again, asserting that “this Administration has declared all-out, global war on the drug menace,” and creating the Drug Enforcement Agency. Ever since we’ve been doubling down on the strategy. It has never succeeded, even when we’ve gone much farther down the “get tough” road than Nixon ever did. 

Read more at The Atlantic

theatlantic:

The War on Drugs Turns 40

Police officers, judges, and prison guards opposed to drug prohibition gathered in Washington, D.C., Tuesday to mark an eye-opening milestone: the 40th Anniversary of President Richard Nixon’s War on Drugs. “America’s public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse,” Nixon declared in a June 17, 1971 press conference. “In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new, all-out offensive.” Just two years later he escalated his rhetoric yet again, asserting that “this Administration has declared all-out, global war on the drug menace,” and creating the Drug Enforcement Agency. Ever since we’ve been doubling down on the strategy. It has never succeeded, even when we’ve gone much farther down the “get tough” road than Nixon ever did. 

Read more at The Atlantic

Remembering Those Impacted by 40 Years of Drug War

"Join us on June 17 for candlelight vigils around the globe on the 40th anniversary of the war on drugs" Find your city

Nixon-appointed commission reported the truth about cannabis, but Nixon didn’t listen
March 22nd marks the 30th anniversary of the release of the report of the so-called “Shafer Commission” whose members were appointed by then-President Richard Nixon. The Shafer Commission’s 1972 report, entitled “Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding,” boldly proclaimed that "neither the marihuana user nor the drug itself can be said to constitute a danger to public safety" and recommended Congress and state legislatures decriminalize the use and casual distribution of marijuana for personal use.

Nixon-appointed commission reported the truth about cannabis, but Nixon didn’t listen

March 22nd marks the 30th anniversary of the release of the report of the so-called “Shafer Commission” whose members were appointed by then-President Richard Nixon. The Shafer Commission’s 1972 report, entitled “Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding,” boldly proclaimed that "neither the marihuana user nor the drug itself can be said to constitute a danger to public safety" and recommended Congress and state legislatures decriminalize the use and casual distribution of marijuana for personal use.

We must wage what I have called total war against Public Enemy Number One in the United States: The problem of dangerous drugs.

You rat bastard.