Fuck Yeah Drug Policy
Posts tagged with alcohol.

Two More Pro-Marijuana Billboards Posted Near Super Bowl

The organization behind the Super Bowl-themed pro-marijuana billboards that went up earlier this week posted two more billboards near the stadium on Thursday, in response to a competing anti-marijuana billboard that was posted Wednesday by Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana).

Pictured is Project SAM’s ad, which they released in response to Marijuana Policy Project’s first five billboards, which promote weed as safer than alcohol. The bottom two are MPP’s response to this message; the first is a spoof of Project SAM’s ad, and the second features a statement made by the group’s leader, Patrick Kennedy, during a recent TV appearance: “I agree with the president. Alcohol is more dangerous [than marijuana].”

[Marijuana Policy Project]

"Marijuana is demonized as a demotivational habit of a lazy crowd, but I am a high performing, innovative, overachiever who uses marijuana to relax after a hard day’s work. I have two college degrees and over a dozen patents in computer science. Like any habit, abuse leads to problems, but properly used in moderation I feel that marijuana is a boon to society, especially when you contrast its effects to alcohol consumption."
Computer engineer farmer808 has been smoking cannabis since middle school. He is now in his mid 40s and works as a computer engineer for a multinational company. He has a medical marijuana card due to chronic back pain – via I like weed, and I’m a good person: Pot smokers fight stereotypes | CNN
Sacrificed Incan Children Died Full of Coca and Alcohol | Motherboard
Researchers ran tests on three creepily well-preserved mummies—a boy and a girl who were four or five, and one 13-year-old girl. They were discovered in 1999 in a shrine near a the summit of a volcano in Argentina, buried some 500 years ago.
Forensics tests on the teenage girl revealed that, for the last year of her life, she switched from eating potatoes to a diet of llama meat and maize. An analysis of her hair—performed by researchers just as if she were a potential employee—revealed that during the same period her consumption of coca spiked as well. Coca is the plant that cocaine is extracted from, and a large lump of coca quid was found in the mummy’s mouth.
The coca leaves contain only trace amounts of the alkaloid that is turned into coke, but the coca levels detected in the mummy were much higher than other ancient coca-leaf chewers. The tests also revealed that she ingested a large amount of alcohol (probably from fermented corn) in her last final weeks of life.
full article

Sacrificed Incan Children Died Full of Coca and Alcohol | Motherboard

Researchers ran tests on three creepily well-preserved mummies—a boy and a girl who were four or five, and one 13-year-old girl. They were discovered in 1999 in a shrine near a the summit of a volcano in Argentina, buried some 500 years ago.

Forensics tests on the teenage girl revealed that, for the last year of her life, she switched from eating potatoes to a diet of llama meat and maize. An analysis of her hair—performed by researchers just as if she were a potential employee—revealed that during the same period her consumption of coca spiked as well. Coca is the plant that cocaine is extracted from, and a large lump of coca quid was found in the mummy’s mouth.

The coca leaves contain only trace amounts of the alkaloid that is turned into coke, but the coca levels detected in the mummy were much higher than other ancient coca-leaf chewers. The tests also revealed that she ingested a large amount of alcohol (probably from fermented corn) in her last final weeks of life.

full article

The Chemistry of Nitrous-Powered, Pot-Infused Liquor | Popular Science

There’ve been alcohol-based tinctures of cannabis before, of course — usually seen in turbid brown jars on windowsills, But one prominent New York bartender (I’ll call him Jon) has been responsible for bringing the infusion up to date with modern, artisanal cocktail culture. Jon is a serious, technologically minded craftsman of beverages; he works as a cocktail consultant, and has designed the cocktail programs of more than one Manhattan bar.
He’s refined a method that’s quick, gives precise, predictable results, and reportedly maximizes the delicious herbal flavor of the drug, to provide a civilized sippable for the beverage connoisseur. Jon’s nitrous-powered Green Dragon “just tastes good. We’ve dialed the strength back substantially, not because we can’t make it stronger, but just because people want to be able to drink more of it, because they like it so much.”
full article

recipe:

Nitrous Green Dragon
a one-liter heat-tolerant whipped-cream whipper
two nitrous oxide chargers
a double boiler large enough to accommodate the whipper bottle
750 ml mezcal at room temperature (Jon uses Vida or Sombra)
3.5 grams (1/8 ounce) of cannabis (Jon uses “indoor high-grade sativa”)
Roughly break up the cannabis.
Put the cannabis and the mezcal in the whipper bottle.
Close the canister and charge it with two charges of N2O according to the instructions.
Let it sit for 5 minutes.
Vent out the pressurized gas. NOTE: you are venting aerosolized ethanol with THC dissolved in it, as well as laughing gas. Jon says “Probably nobody would want to inhale this.”
Stir the liquid and let it sit until the gas boils off.
Place the sealed canister in a double boiler and let it simmer for an hour.
Strain the solids out of the liquid and discard them or dry them for other uses. The liquid is nitrous green dragon.

The Chemistry of Nitrous-Powered, Pot-Infused Liquor | Popular Science

There’ve been alcohol-based tinctures of cannabis before, of course — usually seen in turbid brown jars on windowsills, But one prominent New York bartender (I’ll call him Jon) has been responsible for bringing the infusion up to date with modern, artisanal cocktail culture. Jon is a serious, technologically minded craftsman of beverages; he works as a cocktail consultant, and has designed the cocktail programs of more than one Manhattan bar.

He’s refined a method that’s quick, gives precise, predictable results, and reportedly maximizes the delicious herbal flavor of the drug, to provide a civilized sippable for the beverage connoisseur. Jon’s nitrous-powered Green Dragon “just tastes good. We’ve dialed the strength back substantially, not because we can’t make it stronger, but just because people want to be able to drink more of it, because they like it so much.”

full article

recipe:

Nitrous Green Dragon

  • a one-liter heat-tolerant whipped-cream whipper
  • two nitrous oxide chargers
  • a double boiler large enough to accommodate the whipper bottle
  • 750 ml mezcal at room temperature (Jon uses Vida or Sombra)
  • 3.5 grams (1/8 ounce) of cannabis (Jon uses “indoor high-grade sativa”)
  1. Roughly break up the cannabis.
  2. Put the cannabis and the mezcal in the whipper bottle.
  3. Close the canister and charge it with two charges of N2O according to the instructions.
  4. Let it sit for 5 minutes.
  5. Vent out the pressurized gas. NOTE: you are venting aerosolized ethanol with THC dissolved in it, as well as laughing gas. Jon says “Probably nobody would want to inhale this.”
  6. Stir the liquid and let it sit until the gas boils off.
  7. Place the sealed canister in a double boiler and let it simmer for an hour.
  8. Strain the solids out of the liquid and discard them or dry them for other uses. The liquid is nitrous green dragon.
have a nice 420, everyone

have a nice 420, everyone

(Source: future1luv)

More Older Americans Use Marijuana | NYT

For Cher Neufer, a 65-year-old retired teacher, socializing with friends (all in their 60s) means using marijuana.
Once a week they get together to play Texas Hold ’Em poker “and pass around a doobie,” Ms. Neufer said.
When company stops by her home in Akron, Ohio, she offers a joint, and when it’s someone’s birthday, a bong is prepared. She even hosts summer campfires where the older folk listen to the Beach Boys, Led Zeppelin and the Beatles; eat grilled steaks and hot dogs; and get high (not necessarily in that order).
“It’s nice,” Ms. Neufer said. “It’s just a social thing. It’s like when people get together, and they crack open their beers.”
full article

More Older Americans Use Marijuana | NYT

For Cher Neufer, a 65-year-old retired teacher, socializing with friends (all in their 60s) means using marijuana.

Once a week they get together to play Texas Hold ’Em poker “and pass around a doobie,” Ms. Neufer said.

When company stops by her home in Akron, Ohio, she offers a joint, and when it’s someone’s birthday, a bong is prepared. She even hosts summer campfires where the older folk listen to the Beach Boys, Led Zeppelin and the Beatles; eat grilled steaks and hot dogs; and get high (not necessarily in that order).

“It’s nice,” Ms. Neufer said. “It’s just a social thing. It’s like when people get together, and they crack open their beers.”

full article

1966 Smirnoff Vodka ad
woody allen stand up: “the vodka ad”
Denver, Colorado - unveiled April 2012
Not only is the billboard near Mile High Stadium, it’s also right next to Mile High Liquors. The group Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol said on its website that the location was optimal because it will force some drinkers to confront their bias toward marijuana users. (via The Raw Story)

Denver, Colorado - unveiled April 2012

Not only is the billboard near Mile High Stadium, it’s also right next to Mile High Liquors. The group Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol said on its website that the location was optimal because it will force some drinkers to confront their bias toward marijuana users. (via The Raw Story)

"Currently, 19 states ban happy hour specials, which is one of the government’s ways of reducing alcohol abuse and has been seen as effective — at least in that regard — where it has become law. But in New York City, where most people don’t drive and even fewer own cars, this is less of a public health issue than in places where drunk (or even just intoxicated) driving is part of the lifestyle."
The slow death of prohibition | BBC News (March 2012)

When prohibition came into force, in 1920, saloons across the country were boarded up and the streets foamed with beer as joyful campaigners smashed kegs and poured bottles down the drain.
But far from ending corruption and vice, as opponents of the “demon rum” had hoped, prohibition led to an unprecedented explosion in criminality and drunkenness.
Thousands of speakeasies selling illegal liquor, often far stronger than legal varieties, sprang up across the country - and gangsters such as Al Capone fought bloody turf wars over the control of newly created bootlegging empires.
National prohibition was finally repealed in 1933, but it never quite died out.
When alcohol regulation was handed back to individual states, many local communities voted to keep the restrictions in place, particularly in the southern Bible Belt.
Today there are still more than 200 “dry” counties in the United States, and many more where cities and towns within dry areas have voted to allow alcohol sales, making them “moist” or partially dry.
[…] Methamphetamine and prescription pills like Oxycontin, dubbed “hillbilly heroin”, have taken over from bootlegging and the distillation of moonshine as the main source of profit for local criminals.
Bootleggers once “ran wild” in the area, according to Paul Croley, but with the growing availability of legal alcohol in wet towns, any profit made from smuggling booze across county lines has largely evaporated.
Local law enforcement largely turns a blind eye to bootleggers now, and few cases make it to court.
"It is simply somebody driving up the interstate, bringing beer down here and selling it to people. That’s it. It’s not the Dukes of Hazzard," says Croley.
But the churches argue that alcohol is a “gateway” drug, and is still offered for sale by bootleggers alongside more dangerous substances.
full article

The slow death of prohibition | BBC News (March 2012)

When prohibition came into force, in 1920, saloons across the country were boarded up and the streets foamed with beer as joyful campaigners smashed kegs and poured bottles down the drain.

But far from ending corruption and vice, as opponents of the “demon rum” had hoped, prohibition led to an unprecedented explosion in criminality and drunkenness.

Thousands of speakeasies selling illegal liquor, often far stronger than legal varieties, sprang up across the country - and gangsters such as Al Capone fought bloody turf wars over the control of newly created bootlegging empires.

National prohibition was finally repealed in 1933, but it never quite died out.

When alcohol regulation was handed back to individual states, many local communities voted to keep the restrictions in place, particularly in the southern Bible Belt.

Today there are still more than 200 “dry” counties in the United States, and many more where cities and towns within dry areas have voted to allow alcohol sales, making them “moist” or partially dry.

[…] Methamphetamine and prescription pills like Oxycontin, dubbed “hillbilly heroin”, have taken over from bootlegging and the distillation of moonshine as the main source of profit for local criminals.

Bootleggers once “ran wild” in the area, according to Paul Croley, but with the growing availability of legal alcohol in wet towns, any profit made from smuggling booze across county lines has largely evaporated.

Local law enforcement largely turns a blind eye to bootleggers now, and few cases make it to court.

"It is simply somebody driving up the interstate, bringing beer down here and selling it to people. That’s it. It’s not the Dukes of Hazzard," says Croley.

But the churches argue that alcohol is a “gateway” drug, and is still offered for sale by bootleggers alongside more dangerous substances.

full article

photosoftime:

An NYPD commissioner, John Leach, supervises the destruction of liquor during the height of prohibition.

photosoftime:

An NYPD commissioner, John Leach, supervises the destruction of liquor during the height of prohibition.

"It will be no bad idea to lay away a ten years’ supply of corn whiskey strictly for medicinal purposes, and you will never regret it."

"It will be no bad idea to lay away a ten years’ supply of corn whiskey strictly for medicinal purposes, and you will never regret it."

(Source: lifeofawhiskeydrinker)

urv

Teens getting drunk on hand sanitizer: Doctors in California hospitals warn parents after 6 teens drank hand sanitizer

"This is a very real danger."

"Get the foam variety of hand sanitizer. It’s harder to drink it."

"You don’t really need it at home. You’ve got soap and water available!"

"I don’t think I would keep it at home, unless you’re going to lock in the liquor cabinet!"

LATEST FACEBOOK LINKS
Cannabis Science Continues Forward with FDA IND Process as Patients Report Successful Cancer Treatments
Highlights from SSDP2012
Examining Marijuana Arrests
Anais Fournier, 14-Year-Old-Girl, Dies After Drinking 2 Energy Drinks
'Walmart of weed' opening store in Washington, D.C.
5 Best Cannabis Holiday Destinations…That Aren’t Amsterdam
New Zealand police seize marijuana vending machine
New Hampshire Senate Passes Medical Marijuana Bill
Portland marijuana dispensary opens today
Pamela Anderson okay with sons experimenting with alcohol and drugs
Cannabis and Obamacare: will high court case reveal double standard?
EVENTS
Austin, TX: Texas Marijuana March 2012