Fuck Yeah Drug Policy
Posts tagged with culture.
"When people get older, they get more aware about death. They also get more interested in spirituality. There’s an incredible increase in the use of ayahuasca [among baby boomers]. Ayahuasca comes wrapped in religious origin, so there is more of a veneer of legality than there is for [psilocybin] mushrooms. There are no churches in the US that use psilocybin, but ayahuasca is a legal sect.
Psychedelics dissolve the ego. It feels as if one is letting go of one’s identity; it’s called “ego death” or transcendence of the ego. People often confuse “ego death” with physical death. But it’s a symbolic death. You’re able to find your proper role in the universe.
As for MDMA, older people have more time to work on any unprocessed trauma they have experienced over their lifetime. People have done tremendous healing work with MDMA.”
— Rick Doblin, executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies
This is from the rest of my interview with Rick. You can see what he said about cannabis in my Baby Boomers article

"When people get older, they get more aware about death. They also get more interested in spirituality. There’s an incredible increase in the use of ayahuasca [among baby boomers]. Ayahuasca comes wrapped in religious origin, so there is more of a veneer of legality than there is for [psilocybin] mushrooms. There are no churches in the US that use psilocybin, but ayahuasca is a legal sect.

Psychedelics dissolve the ego. It feels as if one is letting go of one’s identity; it’s called “ego death” or transcendence of the ego. People often confuse “ego death” with physical death. But it’s a symbolic death. You’re able to find your proper role in the universe.

As for MDMA, older people have more time to work on any unprocessed trauma they have experienced over their lifetime. People have done tremendous healing work with MDMA.”

— Rick Doblin, executive director of the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies

This is from the rest of my interview with Rick. You can see what he said about cannabis in my Baby Boomers article

a billboard just outside of portland, oregon

a billboard just outside of portland, oregon

"Guess the nugs…" via Tommy Chong

"Guess the nugs…" via Tommy Chong

More Older Americans Use Marijuana | NYT

For Cher Neufer, a 65-year-old retired teacher, socializing with friends (all in their 60s) means using marijuana.
Once a week they get together to play Texas Hold ’Em poker “and pass around a doobie,” Ms. Neufer said.
When company stops by her home in Akron, Ohio, she offers a joint, and when it’s someone’s birthday, a bong is prepared. She even hosts summer campfires where the older folk listen to the Beach Boys, Led Zeppelin and the Beatles; eat grilled steaks and hot dogs; and get high (not necessarily in that order).
“It’s nice,” Ms. Neufer said. “It’s just a social thing. It’s like when people get together, and they crack open their beers.”
full article

More Older Americans Use Marijuana | NYT

For Cher Neufer, a 65-year-old retired teacher, socializing with friends (all in their 60s) means using marijuana.

Once a week they get together to play Texas Hold ’Em poker “and pass around a doobie,” Ms. Neufer said.

When company stops by her home in Akron, Ohio, she offers a joint, and when it’s someone’s birthday, a bong is prepared. She even hosts summer campfires where the older folk listen to the Beach Boys, Led Zeppelin and the Beatles; eat grilled steaks and hot dogs; and get high (not necessarily in that order).

“It’s nice,” Ms. Neufer said. “It’s just a social thing. It’s like when people get together, and they crack open their beers.”

full article

LEGO pot art show (via flavorpill)

George Carlin speaks about drugs, creativity, and the counterculture

The slow death of prohibition | BBC News (March 2012)

When prohibition came into force, in 1920, saloons across the country were boarded up and the streets foamed with beer as joyful campaigners smashed kegs and poured bottles down the drain.
But far from ending corruption and vice, as opponents of the “demon rum” had hoped, prohibition led to an unprecedented explosion in criminality and drunkenness.
Thousands of speakeasies selling illegal liquor, often far stronger than legal varieties, sprang up across the country - and gangsters such as Al Capone fought bloody turf wars over the control of newly created bootlegging empires.
National prohibition was finally repealed in 1933, but it never quite died out.
When alcohol regulation was handed back to individual states, many local communities voted to keep the restrictions in place, particularly in the southern Bible Belt.
Today there are still more than 200 “dry” counties in the United States, and many more where cities and towns within dry areas have voted to allow alcohol sales, making them “moist” or partially dry.
[…] Methamphetamine and prescription pills like Oxycontin, dubbed “hillbilly heroin”, have taken over from bootlegging and the distillation of moonshine as the main source of profit for local criminals.
Bootleggers once “ran wild” in the area, according to Paul Croley, but with the growing availability of legal alcohol in wet towns, any profit made from smuggling booze across county lines has largely evaporated.
Local law enforcement largely turns a blind eye to bootleggers now, and few cases make it to court.
"It is simply somebody driving up the interstate, bringing beer down here and selling it to people. That’s it. It’s not the Dukes of Hazzard," says Croley.
But the churches argue that alcohol is a “gateway” drug, and is still offered for sale by bootleggers alongside more dangerous substances.
full article

The slow death of prohibition | BBC News (March 2012)

When prohibition came into force, in 1920, saloons across the country were boarded up and the streets foamed with beer as joyful campaigners smashed kegs and poured bottles down the drain.

But far from ending corruption and vice, as opponents of the “demon rum” had hoped, prohibition led to an unprecedented explosion in criminality and drunkenness.

Thousands of speakeasies selling illegal liquor, often far stronger than legal varieties, sprang up across the country - and gangsters such as Al Capone fought bloody turf wars over the control of newly created bootlegging empires.

National prohibition was finally repealed in 1933, but it never quite died out.

When alcohol regulation was handed back to individual states, many local communities voted to keep the restrictions in place, particularly in the southern Bible Belt.

Today there are still more than 200 “dry” counties in the United States, and many more where cities and towns within dry areas have voted to allow alcohol sales, making them “moist” or partially dry.

[…] Methamphetamine and prescription pills like Oxycontin, dubbed “hillbilly heroin”, have taken over from bootlegging and the distillation of moonshine as the main source of profit for local criminals.

Bootleggers once “ran wild” in the area, according to Paul Croley, but with the growing availability of legal alcohol in wet towns, any profit made from smuggling booze across county lines has largely evaporated.

Local law enforcement largely turns a blind eye to bootleggers now, and few cases make it to court.

"It is simply somebody driving up the interstate, bringing beer down here and selling it to people. That’s it. It’s not the Dukes of Hazzard," says Croley.

But the churches argue that alcohol is a “gateway” drug, and is still offered for sale by bootleggers alongside more dangerous substances.

full article

Bill Hicks - Positive Drug Story

It’s always that same LSD story. You’ve all seen it: “Young man on acid, thought he could fly, jumped out of a building. What a tragedy.”

What a dick! Fuck him! He’s an idiot.

Quit ruining it for everybody. He’s a moron. He’s dead. Good. We lost a moron. Fuckin celebrate.

urv

Teens getting drunk on hand sanitizer: Doctors in California hospitals warn parents after 6 teens drank hand sanitizer

"This is a very real danger."

"Get the foam variety of hand sanitizer. It’s harder to drink it."

"You don’t really need it at home. You’ve got soap and water available!"

"I don’t think I would keep it at home, unless you’re going to lock in the liquor cabinet!"

A new legal high goes on sale every week, says EU drugs agency | The Guardian

New “legal highs” and other synthetic drugs are appearing on the market at the rate of one a week, the EU’s drug agency has warned.
The Lisbon-based European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) said 49 new “psychoactive” substances were officially notified for the first time in 2011 through an EU early-warning system.
"This represents the largest number of substances ever reported in a single year, up from 41 substances reported in 2010 and 24 reported in 2009," said the agency.
[…] “We have rapidly growing numbers of psychoactive drugs on the market, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult for the police to identify the drugs they’re finding… Just adding a drug to the long list already controlled won’t make much difference… The police and forensics are under too much pressure already to be able to offer much deterrent to potential users… We are deluding ourselves if we think that using existing controls like temporary bans will solve the problem,” said Roger Howard of the UK drugs policy commission, an independent organisation providing drugs policy analysis.
full article

A new legal high goes on sale every week, says EU drugs agency | The Guardian

New “legal highs” and other synthetic drugs are appearing on the market at the rate of one a week, the EU’s drug agency has warned.

The Lisbon-based European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) said 49 new “psychoactive” substances were officially notified for the first time in 2011 through an EU early-warning system.

"This represents the largest number of substances ever reported in a single year, up from 41 substances reported in 2010 and 24 reported in 2009," said the agency.

[…] “We have rapidly growing numbers of psychoactive drugs on the market, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult for the police to identify the drugs they’re finding… Just adding a drug to the long list already controlled won’t make much difference… The police and forensics are under too much pressure already to be able to offer much deterrent to potential users… We are deluding ourselves if we think that using existing controls like temporary bans will solve the problem,” said Roger Howard of the UK drugs policy commission, an independent organisation providing drugs policy analysis.

full article

Amidst the flood of festival goers at Coachella, Rihanna broke out a bag of weed and proceeded to break up some of the ganja upon her bodyguard’s smooth, hairless skull. She then rolled that ish up like this guy’s head was a table! The ‘Good Girl Gone Bad’ posted the picture to Instagram, immortalizing her resourceful idea, writing, “Memories don’t live like people do #coachella.” Afterwards, Rihanna sparked up and took in some live performances while perched atop the man’s shoulders, sharing her L with friends. (via PopCrush)

Amidst the flood of festival goers at Coachella, Rihanna broke out a bag of weed and proceeded to break up some of the ganja upon her bodyguard’s smooth, hairless skull. She then rolled that ish up like this guy’s head was a table! The ‘Good Girl Gone Bad’ posted the picture to Instagram, immortalizing her resourceful idea, writing, “Memories don’t live like people do #coachella.” Afterwards, Rihanna sparked up and took in some live performances while perched atop the man’s shoulders, sharing her L with friends. (via PopCrush)

This is a clip from a 1990 made-for-TV special Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue!—a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration which saw Bugs Bunny, ALF, Garfield, and the Muppet Babies teaching a pot-smoking teenager “the million, billion wonderful ways to say no.” The full version is a half hour long. George H.W. and Barbara Bush make an appearance to introduce this “powerful story of a teenager dealing with drug and alcohol abuse.” Enjoy.

How TV Fell in Love with Marijuana | The Atlantic

The increasingly normalized depiction of marijuana use on television, taken in conjunction with the increase in American marijuana users, raises a chicken-or-the-egg question: Was TV making Americans more tolerant of marijuana use? Or was the increase in American marijuana users encouraging TV to depict the drug less negatively? 

full article

"Before meth I had a best friend. Now I have a junkie."Butte, Montana - Stevie Dacanay
High Times Cannabis Cookbook BOOKSIGNING
@ Bookshop Santa CruzThursday, April 5, 20127:30 PM in PDT

High Times Cannabis Cookbook BOOKSIGNING

@ Bookshop Santa Cruz
Thursday, April 5, 2012
7:30 PM in PDT

(via hypebeast)