Fuck Yeah Drug Policy
Posts tagged with youth.
LATEST FACEBOOK LINKS
42 Washington Lawmakers Join Governor In Asking DEA To Reclassify Marijuana
NH House panel mulls marijuana decriminalization, allowing nano-brewers at farmers’ markets
The Drug War’s Invisible Victims
Esquire Magazine: Marijuana Should Be As Legal As Cigarettes or Alcohol
U.S. boy, 4, pulls out multiple bags of marijuana at school, tells teacher he wants to share
San Francisco Suspends Medical Marijuana Licensing Program Indefinitely
Event tonight @ Columbia University: Traumatized: The War on Drugs, Child Abuse, and the Teen Treatment Industry
Laughing at Pot Advocates? What’s so Funny About Drug War? | AlterNet

For all the progress that’s been made towards bringing the drug policy debate into the political mainstream, there remains a tragic tendency among many in the press to burst out laughing at the idea of fixing our disastrous drug laws. The latest embarrassing example comes courtesy of Al Kamen in The Washington Post:
Yes, we know that jobs and the economy are the marquee issues for this campaign. Even major topics such as war and education are getting short shrift among the wannabe nominees.
But those reefer-mad kids over at Students for Sensible Drug Policy are trying to, uh, smoke the candidates out on their favorite subject.
…
Pass the chips, dude. This is some entertaining TV. 
Pass the chips? Wow. I can’t speak for Al Kamen, but there’s nothing about the War on Drugs that makes me hungry for junk food. Eric Sterling didn’t like Kamen’s tone very much either and responded with a deservedly harsh letter to the editor:
Regarding Al Kamen’s Jan. 18 column “ ‘Reefer Madness’ for the YouTube Generation”:
This article is consistent with my hypothesis that the rules of professional conduct of journalists or some style manual require that articles about drug policy include a joke about chips, brownies or junk food. Can reporters and editors be so humor-deprived that they always have to joke about laws and policies that every year put hundreds of thousands of cannabis users in handcuffs, give them a criminal record and cost hundreds of millions of dollars on pointless police overtime. Ha, ha, ha, “pass the chips”; I’m dying with laughter.
Kamen’s childishness is meant to be cute, I assume, but it plainly belittles a gutsy effort by a concerned group of young Americans to ask valid questions of candidates on the campaign trail. How odd it is that he calls attention to these young activists bravely confronting prominent politicians, only to turn around and insult them. For what…caring about something?
Is the arrest of close to a million Americans a year for marijuana a strange or entertaining thing to be upset about? For that matter, is our world-record incarceration rate and the spiraling costs that go along with it? Is the escalating violence in Mexico amusing to anyone? If these things aren’t funny, then we should be applauding rather than laughing when someone works to ensure that we don’t ignore these issues entirely when choosing our next president.

Above is a photo from the 2011 SSDP Training Conference & Lobby Day, an intensive training conference that provided students and activists with the skills to run effective campaigns, build campus organizations, improve public speaking skills, and work with the media to advocate sensible drug policies.
Learn more about Students for Sensible Drug Policy

Laughing at Pot Advocates? What’s so Funny About Drug War? | AlterNet

For all the progress that’s been made towards bringing the drug policy debate into the political mainstream, there remains a tragic tendency among many in the press to burst out laughing at the idea of fixing our disastrous drug laws. The latest embarrassing example comes courtesy of Al Kamen in The Washington Post:

Yes, we know that jobs and the economy are the marquee issues for this campaign. Even major topics such as war and education are getting short shrift among the wannabe nominees.

But those reefer-mad kids over at Students for Sensible Drug Policy are trying to, uh, smoke the candidates out on their favorite subject.

Pass the chips, dude. This is some entertaining TV. 

Pass the chips? Wow. I can’t speak for Al Kamen, but there’s nothing about the War on Drugs that makes me hungry for junk food. Eric Sterling didn’t like Kamen’s tone very much either and responded with a deservedly harsh letter to the editor:

Regarding Al Kamen’s Jan. 18 column “ ‘Reefer Madness’ for the YouTube Generation”:

This article is consistent with my hypothesis that the rules of professional conduct of journalists or some style manual require that articles about drug policy include a joke about chips, brownies or junk food. Can reporters and editors be so humor-deprived that they always have to joke about laws and policies that every year put hundreds of thousands of cannabis users in handcuffs, give them a criminal record and cost hundreds of millions of dollars on pointless police overtime. Ha, ha, ha, “pass the chips”; I’m dying with laughter.

Kamen’s childishness is meant to be cute, I assume, but it plainly belittles a gutsy effort by a concerned group of young Americans to ask valid questions of candidates on the campaign trail. How odd it is that he calls attention to these young activists bravely confronting prominent politicians, only to turn around and insult them. For what…caring about something?

Is the arrest of close to a million Americans a year for marijuana a strange or entertaining thing to be upset about? For that matter, is our world-record incarceration rate and the spiraling costs that go along with it? Is the escalating violence in Mexico amusing to anyone? If these things aren’t funny, then we should be applauding rather than laughing when someone works to ensure that we don’t ignore these issues entirely when choosing our next president.

Above is a photo from the 2011 SSDP Training Conference & Lobby Day, an intensive training conference that provided students and activists with the skills to run effective campaigns, build campus organizations, improve public speaking skills, and work with the media to advocate sensible drug policies.

Learn more about Students for Sensible Drug Policy

The Exile Nation Project - Interview with Stephani Conyers from Charles B Shaw on Vimeo.

The Exile Nation Project: An Oral History of the War on Drugs

Interview with Stephani Conyers

Children are the unacknowledged victims of the drug war. In this interview, Stephani Conyers recounts her experience as the child of drug offenders. Both her father and mother received prison sentences in the state of North Carolina for the cultivation of cannabis. Stefani describes in harrowing detail SWAT raids on her family home while only a young child, life in abusive foster homes, drugs and sexual abuse, and her struggle to maintain a relationship with her parents as they went through the criminal justice system.

Check out the interview archive

LATEST FACEBOOK LINKS
Police: Dad Gave Kids Synthetic Marijuana, Insulin, and Energy Drinks for their Health
Medical Marijuana Update
Arizona Medical Marijuana Suit Dismissed by Federal Judge
SSDP Asks Santorum A Question
How Americans really feel about drugs
Newt Gingrich Tells New Hampshire: Jefferson and Washington Would Have Cracked Down On Pot 

According to Newt Gingrich, “Jefferson or George Washington would have rather strongly discouraged you from growing marijuana and their techniques of dealing with it would have been rather more violent than current government.”

Talking Marijuana in New Hampshire | Dare Generation Diary

This week, SSDP sent dozens of students to New Hampshire to attend the 2012 College Convention, a four-day gathering of current presidential candidates in Concord, New Hampshire. Our students are working to get presidential candidates on the record regarding their views on reforming our current drug policies. This afternoon, some SSDP members traveled to a local town hall meeting in Concord, where they caught up with GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich and got the chance to ask him about his position on marijuana policy. Check out the video, and stay tuned for more highlights from this week.

"For some teenagers, it seems like pot is replacing cocaine, alcohol and tobacco. Is that a good thing?” Check out the debate.

"For some teenagers, it seems like pot is replacing cocaine, alcohol and tobacco. Is that a good thing?” Check out the debate.

This is an article written by Joseph McNamara, a retired police chief of San Jose, California.
Drug Laws Harm Teens More Than Pot Does | Room for Debate @ NYT

The appearance of any new study indicating an increase in marijuana use by youth is always a prelude to a renewed government surge in America’s war on drugs. But let’s be realistic about our options. It’s not as though tough enforcement keeps kids away from marijuana. Usage goes up and down no matter what we do. By keeping marijuana illegal, we nudge youngsters into contact with real criminals engaged in the drug trade. Then we bust kids, giving them a criminal record.
We shouldn’t, of course, recommend to kids that they get high on pot instead of drunk on booze or blasted on coke, but recognizing that they may not be the perfect children that we were, the following facts speak for themselves: No one ever died from using marijuana, unlike alcohol or cocaine. Marijuana tends to mellow people, but we know alcohol and cocaine excites some into violence. +

This is an article written by Joseph McNamara, a retired police chief of San Jose, California.

Drug Laws Harm Teens More Than Pot Does | Room for Debate @ NYT

The appearance of any new study indicating an increase in marijuana use by youth is always a prelude to a renewed government surge in America’s war on drugs. But let’s be realistic about our options. It’s not as though tough enforcement keeps kids away from marijuana. Usage goes up and down no matter what we do. By keeping marijuana illegal, we nudge youngsters into contact with real criminals engaged in the drug trade. Then we bust kids, giving them a criminal record.

We shouldn’t, of course, recommend to kids that they get high on pot instead of drunk on booze or blasted on coke, but recognizing that they may not be the perfect children that we were, the following facts speak for themselves: No one ever died from using marijuana, unlike alcohol or cocaine. Marijuana tends to mellow people, but we know alcohol and cocaine excites some into violence. +

Study: Nearly 1 in 3 U.S. youths will be arrested by age 23 | CBS News via NORML

A new study out today estimates that one-third of US young people will be arrested or taken into custody for illegal or delinquent offenses (excluding arrests for minor traffic violations) by the age of 23. +

Study: Nearly 1 in 3 U.S. youths will be arrested by age 23 | CBS News via NORML

A new study out today estimates that one-third of US young people will be arrested or taken into custody for illegal or delinquent offenses (excluding arrests for minor traffic violations) by the age of 23. +

A man in handcuffs cries as he says farewell to his son after he was arrested by the police on suspicion of drug dealing during a pre-dawn raid in an impoverished neighborhood of Bangkok February 25, 2011. The Narcotics Suppression Bureau of Thai police said their aim in 2011 is to stop the expansion of narcotics problem in the country. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
“Drugs are a big problem in Thailand and often we see pictures from press conferences where police display confiscated narcotics and detained suspects after a raid. So, the normal reaction after seeing those was to try to join the police on one of their raids and see them in action. The action I followed took us early in the morning to a slum in Bangkok’s suburbs. It was not a spectacular operation with lots of drugs found and suspects trying to avoid the detention. But, the real personal drama of the man detained was exposed when he hugged his son and cried as he was taken away. A small drug dealer crime - although petty if compared with those from the press conferences with tons of narcotics seized - can take a criminal to jail for a long time. When he comes out his son could be an adult man. Growing up in Bangkok’s slums without a father is not the best way to avoid all the dangers and possible misery.” 
(source)

A man in handcuffs cries as he says farewell to his son after he was arrested by the police on suspicion of drug dealing during a pre-dawn raid in an impoverished neighborhood of Bangkok February 25, 2011. The Narcotics Suppression Bureau of Thai police said their aim in 2011 is to stop the expansion of narcotics problem in the country. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

“Drugs are a big problem in Thailand and often we see pictures from press conferences where police display confiscated narcotics and detained suspects after a raid. So, the normal reaction after seeing those was to try to join the police on one of their raids and see them in action. The action I followed took us early in the morning to a slum in Bangkok’s suburbs. It was not a spectacular operation with lots of drugs found and suspects trying to avoid the detention. But, the real personal drama of the man detained was exposed when he hugged his son and cried as he was taken away. A small drug dealer crime - although petty if compared with those from the press conferences with tons of narcotics seized - can take a criminal to jail for a long time. When he comes out his son could be an adult man. Growing up in Bangkok’s slums without a father is not the best way to avoid all the dangers and possible misery.” 

(source)

A 14-Year-Old Pittsburgh Boy Didn't Die From Smoking Synthetic Marijuana, He Died From Smoking it Out of a Pez Dispenser | Reason →
darian worden’s police state propaganda posters

Bill Maher’s Halloween rant about LSD and psilocybin

"You can’t just decide to give a bunch of innocent, drug-free kids some sort of psychedelic. What if it interacts badly with their Wellbutrin, their Abilify, their Adderall, their Ritalin, and their Monster Energy Drink?"

NORML’s Russ Belville dissects the DEA’s drug war comic, Stumble Weed Magazine | NORML

More of your tax dollars at work, providing flashy interactive content full of drug war lies and distortions meant to encourage kids to avoid cannabis.  Uh, guys, with 83.9% of 12th graders saying pot is “fairly easy” or “very easy” to get and 41.8% of them trying pot sometime in their life, it seems your efforts are for naught. +

What would you say?

What would you say?